Archive for Outerwear Accessories

Hair Hider 2.0

Modelled on my head, cuz I dont have a headform yet.

Modelled on my head, 'cuz I don't have a headform yet.

Actually managed to get a pretty GOOD closeup!!!

Actually managed to get a pretty GOOD closeup!!!

SO, Sis, there’s your hat.  I ended up doing it in two shades of blue because I just didn’t have enough of that royal blue to completely finish it.  But I’ve already had 2 people compliment me on it – May came over yesterday and saw it, and today Hayley came over.  They both said they liked it, so I’m hoping you will too.  😀

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Pattern: Simple Beret

I call this my “Hair Hider” hat on my Ravelry project pages, because I wanted something big enough to tuck my hair into on those days when I’m running late and don’t have enough time to do my hair, or those days when I’m just sitting round the house and don’t FEEL like doing my hair.  But what it is, really, is just a simple beret.

Note: Pattern is for the beret ONLY.  Embellishments, if you want any, are up to you.

Simple Beret

©2008, Suzanne M. Barrow

Materials Needed:

  • Less than 100 grams DK yarn (sport weight would probably be a good substitute if you can’t get any DK)
  • Size G (4.0 mm) hook
  • Yarn needle (for weaving in ends and/or sewing on embellishments)

Ch 4, join with a sl st in first ch to form ring

Round 1: ch 3 (counts as first dc), dc 11 into ring, join with a sl st into top of ch 3.

Round 2: ch 3, dc in same st as joining, 2 dc in each st around, join.

Round 3: ch 3, 2 dc in next st, *1 dc in next st, 2 dc in next st**, repeat from * to ** around, join.

Round 4: ch 3, dc in next st, 2 dc in next st, *dc in each of the next 2 sts, 2 dc in next st**, repeat from * to ** around, join.

Round 5: ch 3, dc in next 2 sts, 2 dc in next st, *dc in each of the next 3 sts, 2 dc in next st**, repeat from * to ** around, join.

Round 6: ch 3, dc in next 3 sts, 2 dc in next st, *dc in each of the next 4 sts, 2 dc in next st**, repeat from * to ** around, join.

Round 7: ch 3, dc in next 4 sts, 2 dc in next st, *dc in each of the next 5 sts, 2 dc in next st**, repeat from * to ** around, join.

Round 8: ch 3, dc in next 5 sts, 2 dc in next st, *dc in each of the next 6 sts, 2 dc in next st**, repeat from * to ** around, join.

Round 9: ch 3, dc in next 6 sts, 2 dc in next st, *dc in each of the next 7 sts, 2 dc in next st**, repeat from * to ** around, join.

Round 10: ch 3, dc in next 7 sts, 2 dc in next st, *dc in each of the next 8 sts, 2 dc in next st**, repeat from * to ** around, join.

Rounds 11-15: ch 3, dc in each st around, join.

Round 16: ch 3, dc in each of the next 7 sts, dc2tog in next st, *dc in each of the next 8 sts, dc2tog in next st**, repeat from * to ** around, join.

Round 17: ch 3, dc in each of the next 6 sts, dc2tog in next st, *dc in each of the next 7 sts, dc2tog in next st**, repeat from * to ** around, join.

Round 18: ch 3, dc in each of the next 5 sts, dc2tog in next st, *dc in each of the next 6 sts, dc2tog in next st**, repeat from * to ** around, join.

Round 19: ch 3, dc in each of the next 4 sts, dc2tog in next st, *dc in each of the next 5 sts, dc2tog in next st**, repeat from * to ** around, join.

Round 20: ch 1, sc in each st around, join.

Round 21: ch 1, sc in blo in each st around, join.

Round 22: ch 1, sc in blo in each st around, join.

Round 23: ch 1, sc in blo in each st around, join.

Fasten off, weave in ends.

Note 1: I made this specifically to fit my own head.  I have absolutely no idea if my head is average size, bigger than average, or smaller than average.  I recommend trying it on after Round 19.  If it’s too big, decrease one more row (ch 3, dc in each of the next 3 sts, dc2tog in next st, *dc in each of the next 4 sts, dc2tog in next st**, repeat from * to ** around, join).  If it’s too small, frog back one row and do one row even (ch 3, dc in each st around, join).  [Or, if you’re REALLY anally retentively perfectionistic like I am, frog back ALL your decrease rows, do an extra row even, and THEN do your decreases, making sure you do one less than the pattern dictates.)

Note 2: You can easily make this hat even more slouchy if you want.  Simply do more increase rows.

Optional: Embellishments

I literally just looked up a flower pattern on the Ravelry database, picked one, and did it in the same yarn I did the hat in.  If you’re on Ravelry, here’s a quick search link for you: click me. If not, here’s a link to the appliques list at Crochet Pattern Central: click me.  What you do, where you put it, what color you do it in… it’s all up to you.  Make it your own.  Give it your own flair.  Be creative!  😀

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It’s not a shawl. It’s not a scarf. It’s… A SCHARF!!!

There’s this woman I “know.”  You know, in the internet sense of “knowing” someone.  And not only does she have an awesome sense of style, but she wears these AWESOME scarves.  I mean, her scarf collection ALONE makes me green with envy.

So me, being the crafty person I am, decided to make myself one.  It took me a while to find a pattern that would work the way I wanted it to (and ended up with one frogged attempt), but I finally stumbled on the perfect pattern for the Classic Cotton that I picked up from that charity shop a couple weeks back.

At first, I was having a hard time finding a pattern that spoke to me.  So I asked for some suggestions on Ravelry.  One of the suggestions I got was the “My Blue Jeans Shawl” pattern.  So I tried that one first.

Scharf, take one.

Scharf, take one.

I LOVED the pattern, but unfortunately it wasn’t going to work.  I would have run out of yarn LONG before I was anywhere near finished.

So I frogged it, and went looking again.

Most of the suggestions I got, I absolutely loved, but some of them just weren’t feasible for me right now.  A couple were published in American crochet magazines – which I can’t get here.  I have heard of other UKers being able to get their hands on a few, but I’m lucky to find a few crochet HOOKS here where I’m at.  Crochet magazines? HAhahahahaHA!

There were a few that were pay-per-download, and while I really did like the look of them, I’m just not in the position to be forking out money for patterns right now.  Not when there are millions of patterns available free on the web.  (Okay, maybe not millions.  Thousands, though?  Definitely.)

And then yesterday morning, I was flipping through my Happy Hooker book while having my morning cuppa, and as soon as I opened the book, it fell right to the page where the Sweet Pea Shawl was pictured.  (Linky-link takes you to the designer’s own website, but if I understand correctly, it was published in the Happpy Hooker first.)

PERFECT!!!

Actually, I’ve been drooling over this shawl pattern for a couple of years now.  I “met” Amie (NexStitch) on Crochetville a few years back, and as soon as I saw her patterns… I was in love.

And I’d bought my Happy Hooker book back in September (actually, I have a post in my drafts about the books I bought, that I never finished), but this is the first thing out of that book that I’ve actually made.

And I don’t know whose idea it was to do a symbol chart on the pattern – could have been Amie’s, could have been Debbie Stoller’s – but I am SO grateful that they did.  (Edit: Got it straight from the designer’s mouth [or fingertips, to be specific].  It was Debbie Stoller’s idea to put the symbol chart in.)  For one thing, having that symbol chart made it easier to adapt the pattern to a smaller size.  For another, having that chart in front of me made it easier to visualize what I was supposed to be doing.

So, without further babbling on, this is what I ended up with:

Scharf, take two!

Scharf, take two!

Actually, if you look REAL close, you can kinda-sorta see the symbol chart between the open spaces in the scharf.

And this is how its supposed to be worn.

And this is how it's supposed to be worn.

The length in front was perfect, but I felt like the sides (when wrapped around my neck) were too short.  So I just took what was left of the yarn, and made tassels out of it.  Perfecto!

Oh yeah, and this only took 2 of the 4 balls of yarn I have.  I’m considering taking the remaining yarn and making some fingerless gloves to go with it.  🙂

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It’s HEEEEEEEEEEEEEERE!

The first ever issue of Crochet Uncut is up, and my pattern is indeed one of those chosen for the premiere issue!

Rosy Shells: Hat & Scarf Set.

Already 27 Ravelers have favorited it, and it’s sitting in 9 queues.

*SQUEEEEE!!!!*

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One-Skein Projects: Caitlin’s V-stitch Scarf

A while back (last year?  year before?  something like that), I made Caitlin (my now-11-year-old) a hat and skinny scarf set in v-stitches.  She had specifically requested it because she liked the way the v-stitch looked.

I think she’d forgotten all about it, because she “discovered” it again while going through the hat/scarf/glove box that I have in the laundry room at the moment.  She really wanted to wear it, but the scarf is so thin that it doesn’t do much to keep her warm (and that was kind of the whole point!).  I remembered making the set, and remembered that it only took me a day or two to make the whole thing, so I offered to make her a new scarf using the same stitch, but wider so that it covered more of her neck.  She picked out the yarn on Friday, I started it yesterday, and finished it today!

Caitlins V-Stitch Scarf

Caitlin's V-Stitch Scarf

Because I want this to actually keep her WARM, I alternated rows of v-stitch with rows of hdc.  Doubled up, the way she normally wears her scarves, it should keep her neck nice and toasty.

This pic shows the color better - its a really light but bright pink.

This pic shows the color better - it's a really light but bright pink.

It took one 100g skein of dk yarn to make this – she didn’t want any edging or fringe, so I basically just kept going until I ran out of yarn.

.... aaand a close-up!

.... aaand a close-up!

Pattern to follow (I’m too damned tired to do it now!).  🙂

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Super Quick Projects: The Nubbly, Ruffly Scarf

As one could imagine, working diligently on Christmas presents CAN get a person a little burnt out.  After all, you’re expending all this energy on other people, and none for yourself.

So I decided I had to make myself something.  Something small, something quick – but something for me.

The yarn in its orginal form.

The yarn in its orginal form.

I picked up this yarn a couple of weeks ago out of the clearance bin in the yarn stall at one of the markets in town.  It was packaged in sets of two for 99p each.  I picked up 2 sets of this stuff and another set of a different yarn in similar colors (more blue/grey than blue/green though).  I just loved the colors.  I didn’t have anything specific planned for it when I bought it, it was the colors that grabbed me.

So when I decided that I needed to do something for myself, I started looking at what I already had in my bedroom stash.  (I have a small stash – mostly for these Christmas presents – in a tote in my bedroom.  But the bulk of my stash is in my cupboard on the first landing of the staircase.)  This stuff immediately grabbed my eye.

Originally, I tried doing a simple sc scarf out of it, but after finishing the first ball, I knew that it would be WAY too short.  So I frogged it and thought for a bit.

What could I make out of 4 balls of this yarn?  What would maximise what I’ve got without looking absolutely ridiculous?

A ruffle scarf!

If you’ve done one of these things, you really don’t need a pattern.  They’re so easy it’s almost ridiculous.  Basically, you chain your desired length, stitch across (it really doesn’t matter which stitch you use, that’s all up to you) for the first row, and turn.  Every subsequent row, you increase every other stitch.  I did it all in sc (mainly because the yarn is a bulky weight yarn and I was using a honking-big ‘L’ hook [8.0 mm]).  So it was *sc in one st, 2 sc in next st* all the way to the end.  And you just keep doing that for every row until it’s as wide (or as thin) as you want it.

I managed to get 4 rows with a really small amount of yarn left.

The Nubbly, Ruffly Scarf

The Nubbly, Ruffly Scarf

And this is what the finished product looks like!  🙂

I love it.  I’ve been wearing it every day this week.  And I’ve needed it!  It’s been friggin’ COLD here!

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